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Mainstream - Diamonds - CBC Miniseries - Part 1 April 5th 2009

Diamonds - CBC Miniseries - Part 1 April 5th 2009
Diamonds
James Purefoy, Judy Davis, Derek Jacoby
Joanne Kelly, Louise Rose, Stephen McHattie
Canada-UK-South Africa Co-production
Part 1 April 5th 2009 9 P.M.
CBC Television

You have to be very patient with the first part of Diamonds, a CBC miniseries that airs April 5th and 12th at 9 P.M. It takes a while for this CBC miniseries to set up who’s who and it makes it even harder on the viewer by presenting many seemingly important characters in the first fifteen minutes or so. It also takes a while for the many pieces to being to fall into place.

In the first twenty or so minutes you are introduced to Senator and possible Presidential candidate Joan Cameron (Judy Davis with an and off American accent), Piers Denmont (Derek Jacobi) owner of Denmont Diamond, black sheep son Lucas Denmont (James Purefoy) who wrestles control of the mining company away from his father, Stephanie Dresser, a Canadian geologist, a fashion model, a rebel leader, a murder victim, and a few other characters who may or may not turn out to be important and not knowing that does not help.

What also does not help is the occasional garbled dialogue.

Part one of Diamonds which airs April 5th at 9 P.M. on the CBC opens with the murder of a blonde American geologist in the Congo. Her mother just happens to be a Republican Senator and very potential Presidential nominee. Mrs. Cameron goes on a fact finding mission to find out the circumstances of her daughter’s death. The viewer know the murder has something to do with the blood diamond trade in which the new head of Denmont Diamond is very much involved in. Meanwhile, the person Mrs. Cameron blames for her daughter’s death, Canadian geologist Stephanie Dresser, accepts a job in the Canadian arctic for a company in direct competition with Denmont.

A scene in part one of Diamonds is a good commentary on the series itself. The British diamond merchant complains there are too many inferior stones in the package. The same can be said here. There is too much of little importance going on for too long. For example, the Canadian arctic segments barely rise above cliché and are little more than obligatory Canadian content for funding purposes.


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